admin

Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    TORONTO — Michael Bublé isn’t feeling particularly sexy sitting in his Vancouver home.

    “I couldn’t look like more of a dork right now,” the singer said Wednesday. “My nine-month-old has smeared pasta all over my face. I’m wearing a black housecoat and I couldn’t find the belt for it so I’m using my wife’s belt from her white housecoat.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Check out Michael Bublé’s new tattoo

    “If all those beautiful women got to see me right now they probably wouldn’t think I was so special. My wife just looked at me and gave me the thumbs down.”

    Bublé, 38, is spending some time at home before kicking off the Canadian leg of his world tour on Thursday night at Vancouver’s Rogers Arena. He then heads east for shows in Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto, London, Ottawa and Montreal.

    Bublé insisted playing for his native country means the most to him.

    “That’s not to disparage other countries but this is my home,” he said, in a conference call. “No matter where I go or how many shows I do for how many countries, or how big this thing gets, Canada’s always going to be the most important to me.”

    The confident showman said his Canadian fans will love the show.

    “I know how good this show is. I know when I leave the stage … people are going to understand why their Canadian boy did so well all over the world, because this show isn’t a good show — this show is one of the best shows in the world without a doubt.”

    Bublé added: “I think I’m one of the best in the world at what I do. I hope I’m a humble guy but I don’t say that with humility. I really believe I love doing what I do and it shows.”

    He admitted he’s not always thrilled about singing all the songs fans want to hear.

    “I’ve never hated singing a song but, of course, you sing it so many times you get tired of it,” Bublé told Global News. “On the last tour, if I didn’t have to sing ‘Home’ again I probably would have been happy.

    “I was doing it out at the B-stage with just me and a guitar and I think it kind of fell flat for me a little bit. Now, of course, I do it in a different way. I try to soup it up and kind of bring it back to its roots so it’s definitely gotten sweeter for me again. I’ve started to learn to love singing it again.”

    Bublé said he has enough of a repertoire these days to be able to mix things up.

    “I try to make things fresh for me and fresh for my musicians — keep the boys on their toes — so if something does get boring for me or I feel like it’s getting stale, I pull it out and I’ll put something else in,” he explained.

    Connecting with the audience is key, Bublé said.

    “I feel like the audience is truly an extension of my family and I have a lot of love for them. Every single night I stand behind the curtain and I can hear the buzz of 12,000 people or 15,000 people and I get goosebumps,” he said.

    “I thank God for the chance to connect with these people. It’s something I promise myself every single night not to take for granted. I always remind myself of how lucky I am. For me, it’s impossible not to connect. There’s nothing fake about my joy. I really am so comfortable and happy and it’s just a natural thing. I want to hug everybody, I want to sing with them and dance with them. I get to be the host of this beautiful party.”

    Part of what makes Bublé so bubbly these days is Noah, his son with wife Luisana Lopilato.

    The singer’s first Father’s Day involved breakfast in bed, a painting made with Noah’s tiny footprints and a rain-soaked ride on the miniature train at Vancouver’s Confederation Park.

    Bublé said becoming a father has made him a better artist.

    “I’m better at what I do. I’m way better at what I do. There’s a fulfillment and a joy that I have in my life that I didn’t have before,” he said. “I was always a happy guy and had a good life but I didn’t know how good it can be.

    “This kid has brought something to my life that I never knew was there. I didn’t know that kind of love existed. It’s allowed me to be way better at what I do.”

    Both Lopilato and their son will accompany Bublé on tour, as well as various members of his family — including his beloved grandfather Demetrio Santagà.

    “It’s keeping me sane and happy and disciplined,” explained Bublé. “It’s almost like a tent in the rain. It’s really comfortable and it feels cozy.”

    Fatherhood, though, hasn’t turned Bublé into a get off my lawn kind of man. He said he’s got no issue with provocative singers like Miley Cyrus and Lady Gaga.

    “Miley’s no more shocking than Madonna was in the ‘80s but at the same time she can sing ‘Jolene.’ She sings the s*** out of it,” said Bublé.

    “I’m not that guy. I come from a very liberal family and I believe in that kind of self-expression. I believe it’s your responsibility as a parent to show your kid the way and it’s not my job to come down on other people and make them responsible for how my kid turns out or what’s happening socially in the world.”

    Did he mention how great his show is?

    “When you come and see this show you’ll understand what I’m talking about. When you leave the show you’ll understand how ambitious I am and how incredible this tour is,” he said.

    “It’s a really beautiful thing to walk off stage every single night and know that you’ve won. And know that you’ve given people their money’s worth and that you’ve taken them away for a couple of hours. I have so much belief in myself and what we’re doing that it’s complete bliss for me.”

    Bublé, in his mismatched housecoat, added: “There’s never a night that I coast or I save myself for the next thing. I walk off that stage knowing that I gave it everything I had for those people — and I think it’s something they can see.”

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    WINNIPEG – A downtown Winnipeg neighbourhood is in the grips of a creepy crawly invasion.

    Countless thousands of worms are covering sidewalks, cars and parking meters, crawling up walls and dangling from trees, and grossing out residents and passersby on Carlton Street north of Assiniboine Avenue and nearby streets.

    “This is the first time I’ve seen anything like this … and I’ve been here 20 years,” said resident Alvin Zorget.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    “You can’t ride on the sidewalk — you have to ride on the road to get away from them,” said Glenn Muzyka. “It’s disgusting.”

    The long, thin black creatures sport a red head and small red feet at the fronts and backs of their bodies are elm spanworms, a city spokeswoman said.

    “Generally, this native pest feeds on elm, oak, red and sugar maple and ash. Egg hatch may begin in mid- to late May.  Mature larvae, sometimes referred to as “loopers” or “inchworms,” are about 50 millimetres (2 inches) long. The body of the larval stage may be dull or slate black and the head rust-coloured. Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (BTK) can be used to control elm spanworm,” Lisa Fraser told Global News in an email.

    “Our surveillance indicates that there are very isolated pockets (individual trees) of the elm spanworm. If significant damage is occurring to the tree canopy in a neighbourhood, the city would conduct a treatment using BTK. We will continue to monitor the elm spanworm over the next week, but their feeding activity will stop in about a week as they begin to enter their next life stage, the pupal stage.”

    Worms swarm on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Jeremy Desrochers/Global News

    Worms swarm on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull / Global News / File

    Worms cover a truck on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull/Global News

    Worms climb a wall on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull/Global News

    An elm spanworm climbes a wall on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull/Global News

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    Watch above: Canada and the U.S. must work together if they want to become global energy and climate change leaders, that’s what former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said while in Edmonton. Laurel Gregory was there.

    EDMONTON – Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addressed a packed audience in Edmonton on Wednesday, discussing U.S. politics and her new memoir.

    She was welcomed with a standing ovation as she took the stage at the Shaw Conference Centre.

    Clinton said she was thrilled to be in Edmonton, “in a city that I’m told is the fastest-growing in Canada.”

    She described the relationship between the U.S. and Canada as “a remarkable accomplishment… No two countries are closer than we are.”

    The 67th U.S. Secretary of State shared her experiences during and shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, running against Barack Obama and then working alongside him, and answered a hypothetical question about her future in politics. Clinton has not said if she plans to run for president in 2016.

    Global reporter Laurel Gregory and Global Edmonton live tweeted the event.

    Clinton told the audience that, when President-Elect Obama asked her to be Secretary of State, she said ‘no’ twice.

    Clinton also talked about her memoir ‘Hard Choices.’

    When asked about the Keystone XL pipeline, she said Keystone should not dictate the entire conversation on energy.

    She ended the event by talking about her newest adventure: becoming a grandmother.

    “I can’t wait. I’m really excited about what this will mean for my life,” she said.

    It was Clinton’s first time in Edmonton.

    Follow @Emily_Mertz

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Hillary Clinton: Keystone XL not a symbol of Canada-US relationship

    • Hillary Clinton weighing 2016 White House bid

      US Secretary of State and possible 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Toronto today.

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    REGINA – The Opposition NDP says the Saskatchewan government should follow Alberta’s lead and scrap plans to build nine joint-use schools through public-private partnerships.

    The Alberta government has said it would cost $14 million more to build 19 schools through a P3 arrangement and has abandoned the idea.

    It says the right choice for students, parents and taxpayers is to use traditional financing.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Trent Wotherspoon, the Saskatchewan NDP’s education critic, argues using a P3 model to build schools costs more and can take longer to get shovels in the ground.

    “What we’re calling on this government to do is see the light of day, to learn from Alberta, to learn from Nova Scotia that wasted a whole bunch of money and to save tax payers money and stop wasting time…and build the schools that we need for this province and do so in the traditional way,” he said.

    The Saskatchewan government says the province is still interested in a public-private partnership and points out that Alberta saved money on its first batch of P3 schools.

    The CEO of the crown corporation, Sask Builds added that Alberta saved money in the past when there were multiple bidders on projects. Rupen Pandya said he expects Saskatchewan to attract multiple bidders because the projects here are different than in Alberta.

    “The last bundle of schools, the fourth in Alberta, is geographically dispersed. There’s a mix of high schools and elementary schools. The Saskatchewan schools are all concentrated, essentially in urban centres; we have schools in Martensville and Warman which are just outside of Saskatoon, but from a market perspective, they’re essentially urban. They’re all elementary schools,” Pandya said.

    Pandya also explained that Saskatchewan will have an independent report done for each P3 to look at value for money.

    ©2014The Canadian Press

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    CALGARY- One year after the 2013 June flood, Kananaskis Country continues to rebuild. Over 300 millimetres of rain fell in the mountain park, sprouting pop-up mountain creeks that quickly became angry rivers gnawed through highways and bridges. About 1,200 people had to evacuate from the park, including many who became stranded.

    “Everyone had their close calls throughout the flood…mine was a little dramatic,” says Gareth Short, a Kananaskis park ranger.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Short could have drowned when his truck broke through the damaged Rocky Creek bridge. Well after midnight on June 20, 2013, he was headed north on Highway 40 after checking some mudslides further south. From his truck, the bridge appeared to be in good shape.

    “I didn’t know it at the time, but the water had eroded all the soft material underneath this asphalt and left it hanging in the air,” he remembers. “I took it at 60 or 70 kilometres an hour and I felt a large, jarring jolt to my front end. My front wheels actually caved in a portion of that asphalt.”

    Instead of sliding backwards into the three metre by three metre hole and down into the icy, fast moving creek, Short got a flood miracle that night.

    “My truck sort of skipped over the hole, my back end went in, shattered my leaf springs, and I ended up on all four tires on this side of the bridge.”

    “I don’t know how exactly I ended up being as lucky as I was.”

    Minutes later, his luck — and foresight — would also save the life of RCMP Cpl. Jane Boehr, who works out of the K-Country detachment.

    She had stopped further south on Highway 40 at Grizzly Creek.  She could see water on the road, but not how much.

    “I sat there probably for five to 10 minutes trying to figure out what I needed to do,” Boehr says.

    Eventually, through the downpour, she spotted a road sign flickering ominously ahead, and made a frightening realization.  Had she continued to drive she would have run straight into a wall of water, flowing about two metres deep over the road.

    “The water was just pouring over this road sign, and… it would ebb and flow up and down,” she says.  “I don’t know if you would have been able to stop in time, it was so dark out.”

    She turned around and headed back north towards the bridge that crumbled under Gareth Short’s truck as he drove over it minutes earlier. Fortunately, he radioed her to tell her about his experience at Rocky Creek, and warned her not to try and cross.  It would be a second close call for the officer in just a few minutes.

    “That would have been a whole different story. I potentially could have ended up in the creek,” she says.

    But the police officer was now stranded near a steep slope, between two raging creeks. During her career, she has she has worked  through a tornado and an armed standoff.  She says spending the night in her truck next to a steep slope where she was vulnerable to another mudslide, was “more” harrowing.

    “I was scared.  At one point it was like, I have no control.  That’s when you really realize you have no control.”

    20 hours later, a helicopter plucked her out — one of 70 rescue flights during what would be a massive evacuation of the entire park.

    “No one was hurt, no one was injured in Kananaskis during that evacuation, and I think we can be proud of that,” says Michael Roycroft, manager of Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park.

    Among the evacuees was a group of 16 Grade 12 students from Prairie Christian Academy in Three Hills. They were on a school camping trip to Carnavon Lake, in the Highwood Pass area. They were wet, cold and stranded in the backcountry, with a lot of people very worried about them.

    “The rain was too thick, we couldn’t get in, and we tried literally three times. It was the third time we got in and we were finally able to sling them out,” Roycroft remembers. He was helping coordinate the evacuations from the Emergency Operations Centre in Canmore.

    “They said afterwards they weren’t sure they were going to make it another night…there was some very appreciative parents and teachers, that we got their kids back,” Roycroft added emotionally, tearing up.

    It was one of over 70 rescue flights, with support from the army. Frank Doll and his wife were camping at Mt. Kidd RV Park in Kananaskis when soldiers knocked on their trailer door. Bridge washouts on Highway 40 on either side of the RV park had stranded everyone in the campground.

    “The army trucks were on the other side of the washout so we went down ladders and so on and loaded up into the backs of these [army] trucks, Doll says. “Good people helped us out and we’re very thankful for sure.”

    The students who were rescued from high in the backcountry were cold but uninjured. The school now has a satellite phone it sends along on all camping trips.  Their bus was stuck near Highwood Junction for several months after the flood until the highway was repaired.

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    Watch the video above: Cost of living increases make for creative education savings

    SASKATOON – As tuition fees across Saskatchewan continue to rise, parents are pinching pennies to put children through post-secondary schooling.

    Kelly Dash is the mother of four-year-old Jack and 16-month-old Joe.

    She and her husband have been balancing the cost of the bare necessities of life with activities their boys are involved in, like soccer and blastball.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Paying for tuition especially difficult for Sask students, says report

    • Students must work 3 times the hours to pay for skyrocketing tuition

    “We’re just doing our best. We’re trying to save as much as we can put away,” said Dash.

    “It can just be overwhelming at times; knowing the right place to commit your money to make sure it’s the right growth for when they need it.”

    It is a struggle parents nationwide can understand.

    Tuition and compulsory fees in Saskatchewan ranked fourth-highest in Canada in 2012-13.

    These costs are projected to hit $7,912 in 2016-17, according to a report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

    Blogger and mother of three, Tenille Lafontaine, knows what it takes to be Feisty, Frugal & Fabulous. Parents frequent her blog looking for advice and recommendations.

    Saving hard earned cash is, as the title of the blog would suggest, a hot topic.

    “Parents want to find ways to do it that’s easy and not really impacting their life a lot,” explains Lafontaine.

    “Definitely couponing, coupon apps, consignment sales. If you’re going to put clothing in a garage sale or kids’ items in a garage sale – take that money and put that into an RESP.”

    Saskatoon-based financial advisor Sarah King says parents need to sit down and have an open discussion about money.

    Parents are advised to decide where money is best spent and what type of position they would like to be in.

    “I think right away, as soon as the baby is born, you get a social insurance number. You can start into an RESP. It can be as little as $25 a month,” said King, with Independent Financial Services.

    Four out of ten students graduate debt-free from post-secondary institutions, according to the Canadian University Survey Consortium Graduating Student survey.

    Thirty per cent of debt-saddled grads wind up owing less than $12,000. On average, they owe $24,600.

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    CALGARY- Despite a State of Emergency being issued due to flood fears, the city of Medicine Hat says it doesn’t think people will need to evacuate their homes.

    An updated forecast from Environment Canada shows a peak river flow of 2,400 cubic metres per second by Saturday, which is half of what was originally anticipated.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Medicine Hat declares state of emergency amid flood fears

    • High River not expected to flood, as rainfall warning ends

    • State of Emergency continues in several southern Alberta communities

    Crews are still working to shore up areas that could be affected, but it appears the South Saskatchewan River won’t rise as much as initially feared.

    An emergency operations centre was opened last Tuesday, and an evacuation centre was set up.

    READ MORE: Several southern Alberta communities under state of emergency

    Sean Balfour’s home was flooded last year, and on Thursday he was out sandbagging, saying he’d rather be safe than sorry.

    “Most of us haven’t even finished rebuilding from last year, it’s exasperating,” he said. “It’s very tiring, it’s a huge weight on our shoulders.”

    During the 2013 floods, 10,000 people in Medicine Hat were forced to leave their homes, and hundreds of homes were flooded.

    -With files from the Canadian Press and CHAT 

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    REGINA – New motorcycle laws have taken effect in Saskatchewan.

    Riders in the motorcycle graduated driver licensing (MGDL) program must now display a placard on their motorcycle plate. Learner riders have to display a red “L” while novice 1 and 2 riders are required to display a green “N”.

    Another change is the hours MGDL learners can ride. Riding is not allowed from one-half hour before sunset to one-half hour after sunrise.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Saskatchewan gives green light to tougher rules for new motorcycle riders

    • Motorcycle safety a team effort: SGI

    There are also new equipment requirements for those in the program. MGDL riders must now have arms and legs covered, wear hand-covered gloves, boots that cover ankles and an approved three-quarter, modular or full-face helmet.

    Starting July 16, people wanting to get a motorcycle learner’s licence must hold a Class 5 or higher license and have either passed a basic ability test or completed an approved motorcycle training program beforehand.

    A change that affects all riders is an increase in safe driver recognition and driver improvement program points for certain traffic convictions.

    Also, inspections are now required for all motorcycles deemed a total loss or that were most recently registered in another jurisdiction.

    The province approved the changes after the recommendations were made by the motorcycle review committee earlier this year.

     
  • admin 21:10 on 29/12/2018  

    WATCH: Every disaster is an opportunity and for Iraq’s Kurdish population, this may be a chance to go it alone. Stuart Greer reports from Erbil.

    Please note: This post, originally published June 18, has been updated to include new reporting from inside the Kurdistan region

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Kurdish-controlled areas of Iraq have been largely spared the country’s worsening turmoil as Islamist militants make their way further south, taking over cities and towns en route to Baghdad.

    The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) took over areas that have large Kurdish populations, including Iraq’s second-largest city Mosul last week, but the Sunni Muslim militant group’s fighters haven’t attempted to move into Kurdish-controlled areas so far.

    Erbil, the capital of autonomous Iraqi Kurdistan, has become a haven for displaced people fleeing ISIL’s violent advances.

    With Iraq on the brink of bloody sectarian conflict between Sunnis and Shiites – again – and amid fears the country could fall apart, the Kurdistan region in the north may have a chance to achieve a greater degree of independence.

    Iraqi Kurdistan is safe – for now

    The Kurds may not have the strongest relationship with the Shiite-led government of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, but they’re by no means pledging allegiance to ISIL, as local Sunni groups in captured cities have.

    Iraq’s Kurds see ISIL as a terrorist group and, with the advance on Mosul June 6, the Kurdistan Regional Govenment mobilized peshmerga forces to protect the autonomous region’s recognized borders.

    Peshmerga forces protected Kurdish territory and moved into Kirkuk – the oil-rich city the Kurds have long claimed as their capital, but which has been under Iraqi government control – and areas of the northwestern province of Niveneh, where Mosul is located.

    Meanwhile, areas inside Iraqi Kurdistan have become a refuge for those fleeing the violence.

    About 300,000 people fled Mosul last week and sought refuge in Kurdish cities and towns, according to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees.

    An Iraqi boy who fled fighting between security forces and al-Qaida inspired militants in his hometown of Tal Afar carries his belongings at Germawa camp for displaced Iraqis, in a hot dusty plain in the largely-autonomous Kurdish area of Dahuk, 430 kilometers northwest of Baghdad Tuesday, June 17, 2014.

    AP Photo

    That’s in addition to about 250,000 Syrian refugees that have fled into Iraqi Kurdistan in the past three years, and thousands of others seeking refuge from fighting in Iraq’s Anbar province this year, according to Rudaw, a Kurdish news network.

    Are Kurdish forces fighting with ISIL?

    Iraqi Kurdistan Regional Government Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani told BBC on Tuesday that peshmerga fighters would not assist Iraqi efforts to reclaim Mosul.

    “It would be a mistake to fight the ISIS at this stage,” Kurdish politician Arif Taifour told Rudaw . “We should defend our own Kurdish territories outside the Kurdistan Region and not become part of the religious fight in Iraq.”

    A peshmerga officer told Rudaw ISIL promised to keep its fighters out of Kurdish controlled areas: “If you don’t attack us, we [will] not attack you,” the group reportedly said in a message sent by courier Sunday.

    But there have been clashes between ISIL militants and peshmerga fighters in the past two weeks in areas claimed by both Kurds and the Iraqi government, such as in Niveneh and Diyala province.

    Six peshmerga were injured Wednesday in the town of Jalula, about 125 kilometres northeast of Baghdad, where the ISIL are fighting to take control.

    Kurdish peshmerga fighters wounded in fighting with al-Qaida-inspired Sunni militants recover in a hospital bed in Erbill, a city in the Kurdish controlled north 350 kilometers north of Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday, June 18, 2014. Kurdish security and hospital officials said Wednesday that fighting has been raging since morning between Kurdish fighters known as peshmerga and militants who are trying to take the town of Jalula, in the restive Diyala province some 125 kilometers northeast of Baghdad.

    AP Photo

    Will Iraqi Kurdistan become independent?

    That’s anyone’s guess. But the prime minister and deputy prime minister of the Kurdistan Regional Government said, in separate interviews, they expect Iraq could end up divided.

    “We’ve said all along that we won’t break away from Iraq but Iraq may break away from us, and it seems that it is,” Deputy Prime Minister Qubad Talabani told TIME, adding that Iraq looks like it may become three separate states – Kurdistan in the north, a Sunni state through central Iraq and a Shia state in the south.

    Kurdish Prime Minister Barzani told the BBC it would be “almost impossible” for Iraq to go back to the way it was before the ISIL advances.

    “Regarding a solution, is for the Sunni areas to decide, but the best model is to have a Sunni region like we have in Kurdistan,” Barzani told Rudaw.

    Kurds suffered under Saddam Hussein: Between 3,200 and 5,000 people died when Hussein ordered a gas attacks on the Kurds in 1988, and between 50,000 and 100,000 more were killed or disappeared during a seven-month campaign that completely wiped out villages.

    The Iraqi Special Tribunal charged Hussein with genocide in April 2006, but was never tried. He was executed on Dec. 30, 2006 after the tribunal convicted him of him crimes against humanity for the 1982 murders of 148 Shiites in Dujali, north of Baghdad.

    But since Hussein’s fall, Iraq’s Kurdistan region thrived – largely thanks to the oil industry. It’s grown about 10 per cent annually, according to an Oct. 2013 report in the New York Times.

    International oil companies are pouring billions of dollars into Iraqi Kurdistan, home to about 45 billion barrels of oil, according to Forbes magazine.

    And the Kurds have built a new pipeline to Turkey that will eventually allow 400,000 barrels per day to flow to the Turkish port of Ceyhan.

    Turkey, which has a collegial relationship with Iraq’s Kurds but not its own Kurdish population, supports the possibility of Iraqi Kurdistan independence. Huseyin Celik, spokesperson for Turkey’s governing Justice and Development Party, told Rudaw the people of Iraqi Kurdistan “would have the right to self-determination like other nations” if Iraq splits apart. But he said Turkey would rather Iraq stay united.

    With files form The Associated Press

     
  • admin 21:10 on 29/12/2018  

    QUEBEC CITY – “My family, people close to me, we’ve all heard about it.”

    It’s an election promise and something close to the Quebec premier’s heart. Bullying is a plague, said Philippe Couillard, that despite laws that have been passed, still poisons thousands of Quebecers, from children to the elderly.

    “We don’t solve a problem like this only by laws and regulations.” 

    “You solve it by showing it’s a priority,” he said.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

      Quebec schools to adopt anti-bullying plan under Bill 56

      Quebec government launches anti-bullying legislation, $1-million ad campaign

      Quebec government tackles bullying with legislation

    “I’m the chief of the government of Quebec and I’m telling the population that this is an utmost priority for me.”

    In 2012, the previous Liberal government forced school boards to implement anti-bullying and anti-violence plans, where rules of conduct and safety measures had to be explained to students at a civics session each year.

    MORE: Montreal kids beat bullying series 

    However, the media kept getting wind of more bullying cases, often ones that involved teens resorting to drastic measures to make it stop.

    Jasmin Roy, an openly gay television personality, said he believes more work needs to be done.

    “People want to find solutions against bullying and violence, so what they need now is to be supported,” said the founder and president of the Jasmin Roy Foundation, a charity that works to fight bullying.

    The premier is investing $200,000 towards a forum on bullying, scheduled for October 2 in Quebec City, launching online consultations for anyone with something to say on the issue and mandating his team to consult with youth centres.

    Opposition parties said they’re on board and compared the collaboration to the non-partisan Dying with Dignity consultations.

    “I hope that we will be able to apply concrete measures after this forum, within six months,” said Coalition Avenir Quebec house leader François Bonnardel.

    Although Premier Couillard didn’t promise millions towards this initiative, he did promise the fight against bullying would start at the top. He admonished one of his MNAs for bullying Quebec Solidaire’s Manon Massé in the hallways at the National Assembly.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel