Page 3 RSS Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • admin 17:00 on 29/03/2019  

    OTTAWA – “The Liberal Party of Canada’s most pressing policy announcement under Justin Trudeau’s leadership was to endorse the legalization of marijuana … What is more troubling is that Justin has been conducting cross-country tours, speaking to elementary school students about the benefits of marijuana.” – Flyer sent by Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino to residents of Vaughan, Ont., in late July

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Retired police officer Julian Fantino, the Conservative minister of veterans affairs, recently distributed a flyer to residents of his Toronto-area riding attacking Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s support of marijuana legalization.

    Fantino’s flyer, like similarly worded mailings by other Tory MPs, says Trudeau’s “first order of business is to make marijuana more accessible to minors,” and that the Liberals “want to make buying marijuana a normal, everyday activity for young Canadians.”

    READ MORE: Tory byelection flyer pits Trudeau against former Liberal MP

    It also says the Liberal leader has “visited schools to tell kids that pot should be legal.”

    But just how accurate are the claims in Fantino’s flyer?

    Spoiler alert: The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney” (complete methodology below).

    This one earns a rating of “a lot of baloney” – the statement is mostly inaccurate but contains elements of truth. Here’s why.

    THE FACTS

    First, let’s look at what Trudeau has said about legalizing marijuana.

    Last summer, he came out in favour of legalization of the drug. Previously, he’d supported decriminalization, but had reservations about making marijuana legal, a policy his party had adopted a year earlier.

    “I did a lot of listening, a lot of reading and a lot of paying attention to the very serious studies that have come out, and I realized that going the road of legalization is actually a responsible thing to look at and to do,” Trudeau said last July.

    Added the Liberal leader: “Marijuana is not a health food supplement. It’s not great for you, but it’s certainly – as many studies have shown – not worse for you than cigarettes or alcohol.”

    The front and back of a leaflet attacking Justin Trudeau, is shown. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO

    READ MORE: Justin Trudeau wants to legalize marijuana

    Last November, Trudeau was again asked about marijuana while campaigning for the local Liberal byelection candidate in Manitoba.

    A journalist covering the event tweeted that Trudeau was asked if he would legalize marijuana and he said he would – but he also said the drug was bad for children and it’s safer for the government to control access to it.

    Now, let’s look at what the Conservatives are saying.

    For the record, Fantino is not the only Conservative MP to send a flyer to constituents claiming the Liberal leader is promoting marijuana to children.

    In June, Vancouver MP Wai Young sent around a virtually identical flyer showing a boy about to light a joint next to the words “The Liberal agenda: sell pot in local stores.” Like Fantino’s, Wai’s flyer claims Trudeau has “visited schools to tell kids that pot should be legal.”

    Similar flyers have also been sent out by Saskatchewan MP Kelly Block, Alberta MP Rob Anders and New Brunswick MP John Williamson.

    In fact, Trudeau has made the argument that legalizing, regulating and taxing the drug would help keep it out of the hands of children and starve organized crime of its lucrative marijuana trade.

    WHAT THEY SAY

    The Canadian Press contacted both Fantino and Trudeau’s offices about the flyer.

    Since the flyer refers to multiple “schools,” Fantino’s office was asked about other schools where Trudeau has spoken about marijuana.

    In an emailed response, spokeswoman Ashlee Smith did not identify other schools, nor did she provide evidence to substantiate the claim that Trudeau has spoken to students about the “benefits of marijuana” – as opposed to stating his position.

    In a follow-up phone call, Smith did not provide the name of any other schools or a specific example of Trudeau speaking to students about the benefits of marijuana.

    READ MORE: ‘Prince of Pot’ returns to Canada after U.S. sentence

    Her statement says Trudeau has “completely disregarded the health and safety of Canadians by continuing to ignore the consequences of marijuana use, particularly where children and teenagers are concerned.”

    “We have seen several instances of this, including when he spoke at a school to children and teenagers about the legalization of marijuana, highly inappropriate and completely lacking in judgment which is par for the course with Justin Trudeau,” she wrote.

    The Liberals call the flyers a Conservative “distortion.”

    “Their charge is based on a distortion of a visit Mr. Trudeau made to Brandon during the recent byelection, when he spoke to an audience of high school students and adults at the Sioux Valley First Nation school,” spokesman Cameron Ahmad said in an email.

    “He responded to a question from the audience about legalization of marijuana, and iterated our position after explaining the dangers of drug use.”

    Ahmad said Trudeau has only ever spoken to two elementary schools since becoming Liberal leader: the one in Manitoba and one in Dryden, Ont., during a Skype chat this past March.

    Trudeau did not discuss marijuana during the Dryden school Skype chat, Ahmad added.

    Nelson Wiseman, a political science professor at the University of Toronto, said these sorts of accusations only work if they contain an element of truth.

    “Had Trudeau not said anything about marijuana – had he said that he was against its legalization – and then had this come out, the Conservatives would have been pilloried from top to bottom,” Wiseman said.

    “But now they can say, ‘No, no, no. These are the implications of what he’s saying.”‘

    THE VERDICT

    Trudeau has said the Liberals would legalize marijuana if they form the next government.

    He has also said that the drug is no worse than cigarettes or alcohol. And he has admitted to smoking pot one time since becoming an MP in 2008.

    But the Liberal leader has also acknowledged the drug’s harmful effects and has said legalization would make it more difficult – not easier – for children to get their hands on marijuana.

    At the Manitoba school, Trudeau spoke about legalization. There is no evidence that he spoke about the “benefits of marijuana,” as Fantino’s flyer claims.

    Nor is there any evidence that Trudeau has ever spoken about marijuana at any other school, counter to the flyer’s claim that he “visited schools to tell kids that pot should be legal.”

    Are Conservatives blowing smoke about Trudeau’s pot plan? by TheCanadianPress

    It would be accurate to say Trudeau visited a single school and, in response to a question about marijuana, said he favours legalization and controlling the drug.

    Whether legalizing the drug would make it more accessible to minors is another question. Trudeau argues the current approach is not working and kids are still finding ways to get marijuana. He has not said his first order of business is to make the drug more accessible to minors, or that he wants to make buying it a normal, everyday activity for young Canadians.

    For these reasons, the claims in Fantino’s flyer contain “a lot of baloney.”

    METHODOLOGY

    The Baloney Meter is a project of The Canadian Press that examines the level of accuracy in statements made by politicians. Each claim is researched and assigned a rating based on the following scale:

    No baloney – the statement is completely accurate

    A little baloney – the statement is mostly accurate but more information is required

    Some baloney – the statement is partly accurate but important details are missing

    A lot of baloney – the statement is mostly inaccurate but contains elements of truth

    Full of baloney – the statement is completely inaccurate

    ©2014The Canadian Press

     
  • admin 16:59 on 29/03/2019  

    ABOVE: It was party time in the Chilean capital of Santiago Wednesday night following the country’s shocking 2-0 upset of defending champs Spain

    RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil – Defending champion Spain, the dominant global football power for the past six years, was eliminated from World Cup contention Wednesday with a 2-0 loss to Chile.

    Spain’s famed passing game failed against a high-tempo, tenacious Chile team, its era ending in the storied Maracana Stadium filled mostly with Chilean supporters.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Eduardo Vargas tricked goalkeeper Iker Casillas into diving the wrong way, then shot into an unguarded goal in the 20th minute. Charles Aranguiz scored in the 43rd when the ball landed at his feet after Casillas punched out a free kick.

    Spain’s second loss, after a 5-1 rout by the Netherlands, ended any hope of advancing. Chile and the Netherlands will both advance, regardless of who wins the game between them.

    READ MORE: Netherlands erupts to trounce defending World Cup champs 5-1

    Spain won the European Championship in 2008 and 2012, in addition to the 2010 World Cup.

    Spain came to Brazil with a very similar – but older – team than the one that won those titles. They added Brazilian-born striker Diego Costa, but he failed to score a goal.

    Their “tiki-taka” style of play — keeping the ball for long stretches with short passes, and only shooting when you had a clear opening  — had not been working as well in recent years. Brazil defeated Spain 3-0 in last summer’s Confederations Cup, a warm-up for the World Cup.

    Spain became the third straight European defending World Cup champion to flop in the group stage. France in 2002 and Italy four years ago also failed to advance, or even win a match.

    WATCH: Spanish fans heartbroken as defending champs exit tournament

    Badly needing a win, del Bosque stayed loyal to captain Casillas despite the veteran goalkeeper’s errors against the Dutch.

    Two pillars of Spain’s title runs, Barcelona pair Xavi Hernandez and Gerard Pique with a combined 194 appearances, were left out.

    SEE MORE: Complete scores and group standings 

    Xabi Alonso probably should have joined them. His agonizing first half typified Spain’s problems and his errors led to both goals.

    And Alonso’s selection left a younger version of his former self, Atletico Madrid’s Koke, on the bench until the logical change was made at half time.

    Alonso gave away the ball to Alexis Sanchez to start a move down Chile’s right wing by Arturo Vidal and Aranguiz, leading to Vargas’ score. Alonso trailed behind the play and put his hands to his head.

    Alonso was booked in the 40th before conceding another foul, on Sanchez, three minutes later 22 yards (meters) out.

    When Casillas punched away Sanchez’s curling free-kick, Aranguiz trapped the ball then flicked a rising shot spinning away from the goalkeeper’s reach.

    Alonso had Spain’s best early chance, a 15th-minute shot smothered by Chile goalkeeper Claudio Bravo.

    Chilean assault on media room

    Earlier Wednesday, about 100 Chilean supporters burst their way through a security checkpoint at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro less than an hour before the game, damaging the media room in an apparent attempt to get into the game.

    WATCH: Chilean fans storm media room in attempt to get into Spain-Chile match

     
  • admin 16:59 on 29/03/2019  

    VANCOUVER – Three human rights groups are planning to launch a legal challenge of a proposed immigration bill that would allow the federal government to strip dual nationals convicted of offences such as terrorism of their Canadian citizenship.

    Amnesty International, the Canadian Association of Refugee Lawyers and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association are scheduled to announce their plans during a conference call with reporters on Thursday, although the actual lawsuit will have to wait until Bill C-24 becomes law.

    The Conservative government’s bill would impose new requirements to obtain citizenship and make it easier for the government to revoke it.

    Under the proposed law, dual citizens who are convicted of treason, terrorism or espionage could lose their citizenship. The law could apply in cases in which those citizens are convicted in foreign courts, and it could also apply to people born in Canada if they also have citizenship elsewhere, such as through their parents.

    Currently, someone may be stripped of Canadian citizenship for attaining it through false representations.

    The advocacy groups behind the forthcoming lawsuit argue the proposed law is unconstitutional. They say giving the government the power to revoke people’s citizenship is the same as banishing them into exile.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    “In Amnesty International’s view, the proposed new revocation provisions are divisive and buy into and promote false and xenophobic narratives about ‘true’ Canadians and others, which equate foreignness with terrorism,” says a report released last week by Amnesty International Canada.

    The groups argue the current bill, which allows the government to rely on convictions in foreign countries, does not include enough safeguards to protect Canadians.

    Opposition MPs and other advocacy groups, including the Canadian Bar Association, have also objected to the bill.

    Immigration Minister Chris Alexander has fiercely defended the proposed law, insisting Canadians support the idea of stripping citizenship from people convicted of war crimes or terrorism.

    “Under the new act, we would have the power to revoke it when someone has refused to reveal that they committed crimes, that they committed human rights abuses, that they committed war crimes,” Alexander told Parliament last week.

    “And yes, Canadians find it entirely acceptable that we should revoke the citizenship of dual nationals for terrorism, spying or treason.”

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    PHOENIX – Immigrant-rights advocates filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging business raids by an Arizona sheriff’s office that have led to the arrests of hundreds of immigrant workers on charges of using fake or stolen IDs to get jobs.

    The lawsuit against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio alleges immigrants living in the U.S. illegally have been singled out in such cases, while only a small number of employers have had court cases brought against them on illegal hiring allegations.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Alberta teen arrested over death threats against Arizona sheriff

    The advocates aren’t seeking money and instead are asking a federal judge to conclude that a state law banning employers from hiring immigrants living in the U.S. illegally is discriminatory and conflicts with federal law. They are seeking a court order prohibiting Arpaio from enforcing that law.

    Arpaio’s office is the only police agency in the state that has raided businesses in enforcement of the employment law. It has conducted 83 business raids since the law took effect in 2008, leading to the arrests of more than 700 immigrants who were in the country illegally and three managers. Three businesses have had civil cases filed against them.

    The sheriff’s office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment Wednesday.

    The raids are a key element of Arpaio’s signature immigration efforts. A year ago, his office was found by a federal judge to have systematically racial profiled Latinos in its regular traffic and immigration patrols. The sheriff vigorously disputes the profiling ruling and has filed an appeal.

    The employment law was passed as advocates for cracking down on immigrants in the U.S. illegally sought to target employers, who are blamed with fueling the nation’s border woes.

    The lawsuit says the Arizona Legislature acted in a discriminatory fashion when it changed identity-theft laws to include workers who use fake or stolen IDs to get jobs.

    Supporters of the raids say the law has helped combat identity theft and that the fear of raids has caused employers to follow the rules. The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the law after business groups challenged it several years ago.

    Immigrant workers arrested on ID theft charges spend months in jail without the chance of getting a bond set, because a 2006 voter-approved law denies bail to people who are in the country illegally and charged with felony offences, from shoplifting and aggravated identity theft to murder and sexual assault.

    Immigrants desperate to earn money to support their families often plead guilty to felony charges to get out of jail, walking away with time served but often facing deportation and unable to ever again enter the U.S. legally, their lawyers have said.

    The lawsuit, filed on behalf of two women arrested in the raids, seeks class-action status that would let other immigrant workers join the lawsuit.

    ©2014The Canadian Press

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    Watch above: Sean O’Shea has some tips on preparing for bad weather. 

    TORONTO – When an EF2 tornado ripped through a housing complex in Angus, Ont. Tuesday afternoon, some residents had no idea what was happening until the funnel was right on top of them.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • ‘I see the sky go green’: Angus residents recall storm that ripped town apart

    • Clean up underway after tornado rips through Angus, Ont.

    Though warnings of the storm system that sparked the twister were all over local news stations and social media sites, depending on what residents were doing they may not have seen the tornado coming.

    “We were outside watching the storm at first,” one resident told Global News. “And then all of a sudden the sky turned green and the wind picked up, so I yelled at my spouse to get down into the basement.”

    READ MORE: Ontario’s deadliest tornadoes by the number

    Angus, like most Canadian communities, does not have a tornado siren.

    But there are many other ways that people can get alerts about impending storms.

    Apps like Weather Alert Ontario – CAD$1.99 in the Apple App store – sends push notifications to the users’ iPhone to display storm warnings issued by Environment Canada.

    According to the app’s description, alerts will be pushed “within minutes from the time Environment Canada issues them.”

    The app has the ability to send audible alerts in the event of potentially life-threatening weather.

    Canada Weather, CAD$1.99 in the App Store, and Weather Warnings Canada, free on the App Store, both have similar functionality for nation-wide weather models.

    Environment Canada, the agency responsible for issuing tornado and storm warnings, does not currently have a mobile app that delivers storm notifications.

    Weather information is available through Environment Canada’s website, automated telephone services and RSS notification systems. The agency would not confirm or deny if it was working on an app.

    “Environment Canada is actively working on exploring and exploiting new technology platforms to disseminate meteorological alert information directly to the public and partner organizations,” read a statement from an Environment Canada spokesperson.

    “This could include using social media as a platform for distributing local weather alerting information.”

    READ MORE: Severe weather is on the horizon: “Keep an eye on the sky”

    Environment Canada does stress that people should invest in a weather radio – a programmable portable radio that issues weather watches and warnings for the user’s area. These radios, with their loud alarms, could serve as personal siren systems during severe weather events.

    The Eton FRX2 weather radio, CAD$50, can be cranked to charge or be plugged in via USB.

    However, for a weather radio to be effective – people must make sure they use them.

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    TORONTO — Michael Bublé isn’t feeling particularly sexy sitting in his Vancouver home.

    “I couldn’t look like more of a dork right now,” the singer said Wednesday. “My nine-month-old has smeared pasta all over my face. I’m wearing a black housecoat and I couldn’t find the belt for it so I’m using my wife’s belt from her white housecoat.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Check out Michael Bublé’s new tattoo

    “If all those beautiful women got to see me right now they probably wouldn’t think I was so special. My wife just looked at me and gave me the thumbs down.”

    Bublé, 38, is spending some time at home before kicking off the Canadian leg of his world tour on Thursday night at Vancouver’s Rogers Arena. He then heads east for shows in Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto, London, Ottawa and Montreal.

    Bublé insisted playing for his native country means the most to him.

    “That’s not to disparage other countries but this is my home,” he said, in a conference call. “No matter where I go or how many shows I do for how many countries, or how big this thing gets, Canada’s always going to be the most important to me.”

    The confident showman said his Canadian fans will love the show.

    “I know how good this show is. I know when I leave the stage … people are going to understand why their Canadian boy did so well all over the world, because this show isn’t a good show — this show is one of the best shows in the world without a doubt.”

    Bublé added: “I think I’m one of the best in the world at what I do. I hope I’m a humble guy but I don’t say that with humility. I really believe I love doing what I do and it shows.”

    He admitted he’s not always thrilled about singing all the songs fans want to hear.

    “I’ve never hated singing a song but, of course, you sing it so many times you get tired of it,” Bublé told Global News. “On the last tour, if I didn’t have to sing ‘Home’ again I probably would have been happy.

    “I was doing it out at the B-stage with just me and a guitar and I think it kind of fell flat for me a little bit. Now, of course, I do it in a different way. I try to soup it up and kind of bring it back to its roots so it’s definitely gotten sweeter for me again. I’ve started to learn to love singing it again.”

    Bublé said he has enough of a repertoire these days to be able to mix things up.

    “I try to make things fresh for me and fresh for my musicians — keep the boys on their toes — so if something does get boring for me or I feel like it’s getting stale, I pull it out and I’ll put something else in,” he explained.

    Connecting with the audience is key, Bublé said.

    “I feel like the audience is truly an extension of my family and I have a lot of love for them. Every single night I stand behind the curtain and I can hear the buzz of 12,000 people or 15,000 people and I get goosebumps,” he said.

    “I thank God for the chance to connect with these people. It’s something I promise myself every single night not to take for granted. I always remind myself of how lucky I am. For me, it’s impossible not to connect. There’s nothing fake about my joy. I really am so comfortable and happy and it’s just a natural thing. I want to hug everybody, I want to sing with them and dance with them. I get to be the host of this beautiful party.”

    Part of what makes Bublé so bubbly these days is Noah, his son with wife Luisana Lopilato.

    The singer’s first Father’s Day involved breakfast in bed, a painting made with Noah’s tiny footprints and a rain-soaked ride on the miniature train at Vancouver’s Confederation Park.

    Bublé said becoming a father has made him a better artist.

    “I’m better at what I do. I’m way better at what I do. There’s a fulfillment and a joy that I have in my life that I didn’t have before,” he said. “I was always a happy guy and had a good life but I didn’t know how good it can be.

    “This kid has brought something to my life that I never knew was there. I didn’t know that kind of love existed. It’s allowed me to be way better at what I do.”

    Both Lopilato and their son will accompany Bublé on tour, as well as various members of his family — including his beloved grandfather Demetrio Santagà.

    “It’s keeping me sane and happy and disciplined,” explained Bublé. “It’s almost like a tent in the rain. It’s really comfortable and it feels cozy.”

    Fatherhood, though, hasn’t turned Bublé into a get off my lawn kind of man. He said he’s got no issue with provocative singers like Miley Cyrus and Lady Gaga.

    “Miley’s no more shocking than Madonna was in the ‘80s but at the same time she can sing ‘Jolene.’ She sings the s*** out of it,” said Bublé.

    “I’m not that guy. I come from a very liberal family and I believe in that kind of self-expression. I believe it’s your responsibility as a parent to show your kid the way and it’s not my job to come down on other people and make them responsible for how my kid turns out or what’s happening socially in the world.”

    Did he mention how great his show is?

    “When you come and see this show you’ll understand what I’m talking about. When you leave the show you’ll understand how ambitious I am and how incredible this tour is,” he said.

    “It’s a really beautiful thing to walk off stage every single night and know that you’ve won. And know that you’ve given people their money’s worth and that you’ve taken them away for a couple of hours. I have so much belief in myself and what we’re doing that it’s complete bliss for me.”

    Bublé, in his mismatched housecoat, added: “There’s never a night that I coast or I save myself for the next thing. I walk off that stage knowing that I gave it everything I had for those people — and I think it’s something they can see.”

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    WINNIPEG – A downtown Winnipeg neighbourhood is in the grips of a creepy crawly invasion.

    Countless thousands of worms are covering sidewalks, cars and parking meters, crawling up walls and dangling from trees, and grossing out residents and passersby on Carlton Street north of Assiniboine Avenue and nearby streets.

    “This is the first time I’ve seen anything like this … and I’ve been here 20 years,” said resident Alvin Zorget.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    “You can’t ride on the sidewalk — you have to ride on the road to get away from them,” said Glenn Muzyka. “It’s disgusting.”

    The long, thin black creatures sport a red head and small red feet at the fronts and backs of their bodies are elm spanworms, a city spokeswoman said.

    “Generally, this native pest feeds on elm, oak, red and sugar maple and ash. Egg hatch may begin in mid- to late May.  Mature larvae, sometimes referred to as “loopers” or “inchworms,” are about 50 millimetres (2 inches) long. The body of the larval stage may be dull or slate black and the head rust-coloured. Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (BTK) can be used to control elm spanworm,” Lisa Fraser told Global News in an email.

    “Our surveillance indicates that there are very isolated pockets (individual trees) of the elm spanworm. If significant damage is occurring to the tree canopy in a neighbourhood, the city would conduct a treatment using BTK. We will continue to monitor the elm spanworm over the next week, but their feeding activity will stop in about a week as they begin to enter their next life stage, the pupal stage.”

    Worms swarm on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Jeremy Desrochers/Global News

    Worms swarm on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull / Global News / File

    Worms cover a truck on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull/Global News

    Worms climb a wall on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull/Global News

    An elm spanworm climbes a wall on Carlton Street in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

    Randall Paull/Global News

     
  • admin 16:52 on 01/03/2019  

    Watch above: Canada and the U.S. must work together if they want to become global energy and climate change leaders, that’s what former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said while in Edmonton. Laurel Gregory was there.

    EDMONTON – Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addressed a packed audience in Edmonton on Wednesday, discussing U.S. politics and her new memoir.

    She was welcomed with a standing ovation as she took the stage at the Shaw Conference Centre.

    Clinton said she was thrilled to be in Edmonton, “in a city that I’m told is the fastest-growing in Canada.”

    She described the relationship between the U.S. and Canada as “a remarkable accomplishment… No two countries are closer than we are.”

    The 67th U.S. Secretary of State shared her experiences during and shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, running against Barack Obama and then working alongside him, and answered a hypothetical question about her future in politics. Clinton has not said if she plans to run for president in 2016.

    Global reporter Laurel Gregory and Global Edmonton live tweeted the event.

    Clinton told the audience that, when President-Elect Obama asked her to be Secretary of State, she said ‘no’ twice.

    Clinton also talked about her memoir ‘Hard Choices.’

    When asked about the Keystone XL pipeline, she said Keystone should not dictate the entire conversation on energy.

    She ended the event by talking about her newest adventure: becoming a grandmother.

    “I can’t wait. I’m really excited about what this will mean for my life,” she said.

    It was Clinton’s first time in Edmonton.

    Follow @Emily_Mertz

    HangZhou Night Net

    Related

    • Hillary Clinton: Keystone XL not a symbol of Canada-US relationship

    • Hillary Clinton weighing 2016 White House bid

      US Secretary of State and possible 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Toronto today.

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    REGINA – The Opposition NDP says the Saskatchewan government should follow Alberta’s lead and scrap plans to build nine joint-use schools through public-private partnerships.

    The Alberta government has said it would cost $14 million more to build 19 schools through a P3 arrangement and has abandoned the idea.

    It says the right choice for students, parents and taxpayers is to use traditional financing.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Trent Wotherspoon, the Saskatchewan NDP’s education critic, argues using a P3 model to build schools costs more and can take longer to get shovels in the ground.

    “What we’re calling on this government to do is see the light of day, to learn from Alberta, to learn from Nova Scotia that wasted a whole bunch of money and to save tax payers money and stop wasting time…and build the schools that we need for this province and do so in the traditional way,” he said.

    The Saskatchewan government says the province is still interested in a public-private partnership and points out that Alberta saved money on its first batch of P3 schools.

    The CEO of the crown corporation, Sask Builds added that Alberta saved money in the past when there were multiple bidders on projects. Rupen Pandya said he expects Saskatchewan to attract multiple bidders because the projects here are different than in Alberta.

    “The last bundle of schools, the fourth in Alberta, is geographically dispersed. There’s a mix of high schools and elementary schools. The Saskatchewan schools are all concentrated, essentially in urban centres; we have schools in Martensville and Warman which are just outside of Saskatoon, but from a market perspective, they’re essentially urban. They’re all elementary schools,” Pandya said.

    Pandya also explained that Saskatchewan will have an independent report done for each P3 to look at value for money.

    ©2014The Canadian Press

     
  • admin 15:26 on 29/01/2019  

    CALGARY- One year after the 2013 June flood, Kananaskis Country continues to rebuild. Over 300 millimetres of rain fell in the mountain park, sprouting pop-up mountain creeks that quickly became angry rivers gnawed through highways and bridges. About 1,200 people had to evacuate from the park, including many who became stranded.

    “Everyone had their close calls throughout the flood…mine was a little dramatic,” says Gareth Short, a Kananaskis park ranger.

    Story continues below

    HangZhou Night Net

    Short could have drowned when his truck broke through the damaged Rocky Creek bridge. Well after midnight on June 20, 2013, he was headed north on Highway 40 after checking some mudslides further south. From his truck, the bridge appeared to be in good shape.

    “I didn’t know it at the time, but the water had eroded all the soft material underneath this asphalt and left it hanging in the air,” he remembers. “I took it at 60 or 70 kilometres an hour and I felt a large, jarring jolt to my front end. My front wheels actually caved in a portion of that asphalt.”

    Instead of sliding backwards into the three metre by three metre hole and down into the icy, fast moving creek, Short got a flood miracle that night.

    “My truck sort of skipped over the hole, my back end went in, shattered my leaf springs, and I ended up on all four tires on this side of the bridge.”

    “I don’t know how exactly I ended up being as lucky as I was.”

    Minutes later, his luck — and foresight — would also save the life of RCMP Cpl. Jane Boehr, who works out of the K-Country detachment.

    She had stopped further south on Highway 40 at Grizzly Creek.  She could see water on the road, but not how much.

    “I sat there probably for five to 10 minutes trying to figure out what I needed to do,” Boehr says.

    Eventually, through the downpour, she spotted a road sign flickering ominously ahead, and made a frightening realization.  Had she continued to drive she would have run straight into a wall of water, flowing about two metres deep over the road.

    “The water was just pouring over this road sign, and… it would ebb and flow up and down,” she says.  “I don’t know if you would have been able to stop in time, it was so dark out.”

    She turned around and headed back north towards the bridge that crumbled under Gareth Short’s truck as he drove over it minutes earlier. Fortunately, he radioed her to tell her about his experience at Rocky Creek, and warned her not to try and cross.  It would be a second close call for the officer in just a few minutes.

    “That would have been a whole different story. I potentially could have ended up in the creek,” she says.

    But the police officer was now stranded near a steep slope, between two raging creeks. During her career, she has she has worked  through a tornado and an armed standoff.  She says spending the night in her truck next to a steep slope where she was vulnerable to another mudslide, was “more” harrowing.

    “I was scared.  At one point it was like, I have no control.  That’s when you really realize you have no control.”

    20 hours later, a helicopter plucked her out — one of 70 rescue flights during what would be a massive evacuation of the entire park.

    “No one was hurt, no one was injured in Kananaskis during that evacuation, and I think we can be proud of that,” says Michael Roycroft, manager of Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park.

    Among the evacuees was a group of 16 Grade 12 students from Prairie Christian Academy in Three Hills. They were on a school camping trip to Carnavon Lake, in the Highwood Pass area. They were wet, cold and stranded in the backcountry, with a lot of people very worried about them.

    “The rain was too thick, we couldn’t get in, and we tried literally three times. It was the third time we got in and we were finally able to sling them out,” Roycroft remembers. He was helping coordinate the evacuations from the Emergency Operations Centre in Canmore.

    “They said afterwards they weren’t sure they were going to make it another night…there was some very appreciative parents and teachers, that we got their kids back,” Roycroft added emotionally, tearing up.

    It was one of over 70 rescue flights, with support from the army. Frank Doll and his wife were camping at Mt. Kidd RV Park in Kananaskis when soldiers knocked on their trailer door. Bridge washouts on Highway 40 on either side of the RV park had stranded everyone in the campground.

    “The army trucks were on the other side of the washout so we went down ladders and so on and loaded up into the backs of these [army] trucks, Doll says. “Good people helped us out and we’re very thankful for sure.”

    The students who were rescued from high in the backcountry were cold but uninjured. The school now has a satellite phone it sends along on all camping trips.  Their bus was stuck near Highwood Junction for several months after the flood until the highway was repaired.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel